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Trump still pondering Supreme Court pick as big reveal nears

Trump still pondering Supreme Court pick as big reveal nears

Americans should give the president a chance, Phillips said Sunday, at least long enough to actually let him announce his Supreme Court selection. Foreseeing inevitable news break-ins to offer coverage and analysis, broadcasters are rejiggering their primetime lineups so as to keep too much fresh summer fare from being preempted.

Trump has spent the weekend discussing his options with allies and will announce his pick at 9 p.m. Monday from the White House.

Leonard Leo, who is advising Trump on his pick to fill the seat of Justice Anthony Kennedy, said two names on the president's shortlist - Raymond Kethledge and Thomas Hardiman - had less established conservative records, making it harder to line up support should they be selected.

Some conservatives have expressed concerns about Kavanaugh - a longtime judge and former clerk for Kennedy - questioning his commitment to social issues like abortion and noting his time serving under President George W. Bush as evidence he is a more establishment choice.

"If we put another two or perhaps three justices on". "Nobody really knows", he said. The three others interviewed were justices Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett and Raymond Kethledge. Has the president informed Republican Party leaders who he will nominate? I've argued cases before the Supreme Court for them.

Mr Thapar, 49, a Cincinnati-based federal appeals court judge, was among the first four candidates interviewed by Mr Trump on July 2.

A Trump federal appeals court pick in 2017, Barrett was grilled by Democrats about her religious background at her confirmation hearing - with Sen.

"Just as he did with Neil Gorsuch, the president has promised to nominate an impartial judge, a wise and seasoned jurist committed to upholding the Constitution at all costs", he writes.

Blumenthal accused Trump of turning himself into a "puppet of outside groups" by choosing his nominee from "a group of rightwing fringe ideologues that have prepared this list". He also called the court's majority approach a "radical extension of the Supreme Court's abortion jurisprudence". "We've been talking about this for 36 years going all the way back to the nomination of Sandra O'Connor, and after that you only have a single individual on the court who has expressly said he would overturn Roe".

While the U.S. Senate once required a 60-vote supermajority to overcome blocking tactics against Supreme Court nominees, the Republican majority changed the rules a year ago during the debate on Justice Neil Gorsuch.